MEL Magazine

The Queen of the Bimbos Isn’t Nearly as Dumb as You Probably Think She Is

Underestimate Alicia Amira, the leader of the Be a Bimbo Movement, at your own risk

In July 2018, I explored the world of women with big fake breasts and tight pink dresses — or women better known as bimbos (which is also how they self-identify). Unfortunately, though, I wasn’t able to talk to the Queen of the Bimbos, Alicia Amira, the woman most responsible for popularizing the idea of reclaiming hyper-femininity.

Until now, that is.

Amira, 29, lives in Brighton, U.K. She was more of a goth chick back in her hometown of Copenhagen, but after moving to the U.K. around three years ago, she decided to pursue an even more alternative style. Thus began her bimbo transformation.

Unlike the bimbos I spoke to initially, however, Amira isn’t an advocate of excessive plastic surgery (though she still loves her fake breasts and lip injections). She also gives the Barbie look her own twist — for example, she has numerous large and visible tattoos. In fact, she wants to expand her brand of bimboism to women of any aesthetic.

In addition to creating porn and running an OnlyFans account, Amira is in the process of launching a clothing brand called Be a Bimbo, where she’ll sell pink, shiny and gaudy fashions associated with the bimbo identity. When she finally agreed to my interview request recently, we discussed her philosophy behind the bimbo branding that her clothing line (and life, frankly) is built upon, her crusade to get bimbos to be taken seriously and why a highly sexual woman seems to terrify men and governments alike — among, of course, numerous other topics.

What does it mean to be a bimbo right now on the cusp of 2019?
So much has happened in 2018. It’s been a year of change in many aspects and especially in regards to what it means to be a bimbo. I’ve worked hard to help push people’s understanding and awareness of the immediate ridicule, exclusion and stigma women suffer when they choose to dress hyper-feminine and look like a bimbo. Because a woman who looks like a bimbo is often judged for having poor judgment, lack of intelligence, declining morals, etc.

But a bimbo isn’t a dumb blonde “airhead.” She isn’t just a sex object. She isn’t oblivious to what’s going on in society. And she most certainly isn’t a victim of a fantasy created by men. A bimbo is an intelligent, creative, fun, confident woman who is taking ownership of her own sexuality and refuses to be judged by her looks. It’s an ancient way of thinking that people (generally speaking) still are judging women who dress sexy, wear lots of makeup and look hyper-feminine.

There’s such a stigma to looking hyper-feminine as if that’s worth less than looking hyper-masculine. A bimbo is a woman who is refusing to be judged by her choice of dress and makeup, and she is empowering all women to be brave enough to take ownership of their own sexuality and refuse to let society dictate a person’s personality and intellect based on their looks.

How much of that changed in 2018?
I’ve noticed that more and more people (in a small corner of the internet) have become aware of the injustice women face when looking hyper-feminine and sexual. And I’ve noticed that more and more people seem to be empowering each other to be confident enough to go for their dreams and to think for themselves. But there’s a long way to go.

It still isn’t mainstream to think highly of a bimbo. I still turn on the TV and radio, and see or hear the word “bimbo” being used in a demeaning manner. But I will fight for the cause until it’s socially acceptable to dress like a bimbo (over the age of 18) and be in a position of power as a bimbo. I’m here to reclaim the word bimbo, and every day more and more people are too. So we’re moving in the right direction.

Until we get to full acceptance, though, what still needs to change? Or what are the things that people still get wrong about bimbos?
That because you look like a bimbo, you’re stupid. I find it to be caused by the fear of accepting any human who is happy and confident in their own sexuality. It’s the same reason why so many countries and governments refuse to accept the sex industry — and especially the women in the sex industry — as equals. It’s a fear of letting people think for themselves. Letting people choose for themselves would mean not everything you’ve been told about the sex industry is true. It would mean that women who are happy in the sex industry aren’t a myth. If it was accepted to work in the sex industry, it would mean that more women would seek that line of work, and that loss of “control” scares people.

It’s much easier to judge than to educate yourself on a subject, which is the same with women who dress like bimbos. For many years, people with face tattoos suffered the same kind of judgment. In general, people like to fit us into boxes. So if you’re a bimbo like me — who’s intelligent, who’s studied at university, who’s never done drugs, who has no mental illness and who has a very healthy relationship with her family — people still think that something “went wrong” because I choose to look the way I do and do what I do. Because “what girl in her right mind would choose that for herself”? It’s the way people have been taught to think about bimbos.

But I’m here to prove them wrong, and so are many, many, other bimbos! You can be everything you want and still be a bimbo. A lawyer, a stripper, an artist, a doctor — it doesn’t matter if you dress hyper-feminine. Why should that reflect your intellect? Times are changing, and I’m very happy about it, because it means less judgment and more open-mindedness.

How is your lifestyle different from other types of bimbofication, such as hypnosis bimbofication, where a soft female voice trances you into mindless, big-breasted oblivion? And do you have an opinion of other kinds of bimbofication?
I love all kinds. It’s just not my personal preference to make myself dumber. Bimbofication is a fetish, and all fetishes have a purpose of making the person living the fetish feel good. However, my “Be a Bimbo movement” isn’t based on a fetish, it’s based solely on the bimbo look. And it’s a revolution against the stigma associated with being a bimbo and looking like a bimbo — and looking overly feminine and sexual.

Many women are bimbos without being interested in the bimbofication fetish. Personally, I’m interested in bimbofication, but I’m embracing all of my personality traits at the same time. I’d never, for example, make myself dumber, but I don’t judge the girls who do. We fight for the same cause — just with a different weapon. They should have the freedom to make their own choices without being judged by me, you or anyone else.

From a completely personal standpoint, how has bimbofication changed your life?
I had no obstacles in my life before I started to dress and look like a bimbo, so in many ways, I created a lot of obstacles for myself by choosing to live my dream and dress as I wanted. It takes confidence to be met with judgmental looks, points and stares daily. But it’s all worth it, because I dress for myself and for all other women.

What we do today will change the way the world perceives of women who are taking ownership of their own sexuality in the future. And every little step I take while wearing my high heels, I take proudly and consider myself lucky to be able to help inspire and empower other women to do the same. I’m constantly overwhelmed by all the amazing women and bimbos who walk alongside me. I’ve been very focused on ending the stigma and to reclaim the word from the first time I noticed that people took me less seriously than they used to — before I looked like a bimbo — and I work hard every day to help inspire other women to find their confidence to be a bimbo and take ownership of their own sexuality.