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What Makes Me… a Sucker?

According to a bounty hunter, a sugar baby and five other experts in their fields

In this installment of our “What Makes Me a…” column, we asked seven people what singles you out as an easy mark.

Thomas Gianaris, Lawyer: A sucker is someone who’s good-hearted and a perpetual optimist despite being victimized throughout his or her life. They’re unaccustomed to evil, refusing to yield even though they’ve been Ponzied too many times to count. They will continue sending money to a nonexistent lover because the thought of cutting them off is too difficult to bear. They will continue paying transactional fees even though the transaction never happens. Age has no bearing; the young are just as susceptible as the old. We only hear more about oldsters getting conned because they lose the big bucks! Nor does occupation and education matter. A sucker who’s a genius will share the same fate as those who are less educated.

Naylani, Sugar Baby: When a client knows what he wants, he instantly becomes easy money because I can respond to that desire. You want someone who thinks of sex as a transaction? ME TOO! You want someone who you can have meaningful conversations with? ME TOO! Any time I can figure out what you want and play that part, I can turn you into easy money.

Rob Dick, Bounty Hunter School Instructor: As a bounty hunter, I’m always amazed at the way some fugitives fall for scams. We’ll pull some outrageous scams when we’re chasing after fugitives — I mean, doesn’t anyone ever watch Catfish? It never fails: A 30-something or 40-something male fugitive will meet anywhere, anytime for the chance to hang out and maybe hook up with a 20-something female stripper. On the way to jail, they’ll always cry about how they almost got to meet this “hot girl.” Honestly, most male fugitives are suckers.

Dillon Eaves, Tattoo Artist: A sucker is someone you can manipulate and bend to your will — someone who is so eager to please that they clamor at the chance to impress you. One can be a sucker in a lot of ways: A sucker for love, a sucker for popularity, a sucker for work. In fact, we’re all suckers in one way or another.

Rayne Parvis, Personal Stylist: I know I can be a sucker sometimes. For instance, when I do the initial consultation, I ask my clients what their budget is. Most of the time, they’ll say they’re on a tight budget ($1,000 or less), so I end up working a few hours for free and over-delivering. Then, when I go to take them shopping, they love everything and end up spending $5,000. I’m like, “I thought you were on a budget!” Instead of sticking to my rates, I go above and beyond because I’m trying to help out someone who says they’re on a budget, when in reality, they’re not so much.

David Wiss, Nutritionist: The diet industry thrives on repeat customers (or “suckers”) who go on countless cleansing and detoxification programs, never addressing the root cause and staying in the cycle of consuming “target market” products. The current buzzwords in the nutrition world are “cleanse” and “detox,” and people are willing to spend good money in pursuit of these “experiences.” These buzzwords are lucrative because more and more people are feeling “dirty” and “toxic” and are desperate for a quick fix.

We live in a system where we tend to treat symptoms rather than the root cause. Feeling toxic is typically a symptom of a poor diet. So unless one’s underlying relationship to food is addressed, the symptoms are likely to reemerge. But often times the mind doesn’t want to believe there’s a root cause that requires significant attention; instead, the mind wants to believe there’s an easy fix by treating the symptoms. This is like an alcoholic who goes to a seven-day detox expecting their alcoholism to be gone afterward.

Jane Starr, Porn Performer, Escort and Dominatrix: Someone who shows up when they say they’re gonna show up, pays me, blows me and leaves.