Popper_Travel

Can You Fly With Poppers, Juuls, CBD, Sex Toys and Booze?

Your definitive guide to packing all your favorite vices on a plane — and everything the TSA will and won’t snag

There’s nothing worse than standing in line for the TSA security check at the airport and suddenly realizing, Shit, are they going to take my Juul? You can’t leave the line, but you can’t part with the beloved e-cig that’s actually killing you. So what do you do? Shove it in the bottom of your carry-on and pray the TSA official understands. We’re all addicted, anyway.

So to save you the hassle and possible embarrassment of getting your prized vices confiscated, let’s look at some of the more… controversial items you can and can’t bring on a plane.

Flying With a Juul

Juuls are a yes. The Transportation Security Administration says battery-powered electronic e-cigarettes, vapes, vaporizers and e-hookahs are all approved to pack in your carry-on. In fact, because they’re battery-powered, they have to go in your carry-on. Most battery-powered electronics are no-gos in a checked bag.

Flying With CBD

California and 10 other states, as well as Washington, D.C., have legalized weed; however, marijuana is still illegal at the federal level. In practice, this means it’s illegal to carry cannabis in places governed by federal jurisdiction, such as an airport.

Thankfully, the TSA recently changed its guidelines for medical marijuana. It now says CBD products approved by the FDA and with no more than 0.3 percent THC are security-safe.

Great, so what CBD products are FDA-approved? Well, none.

The Los Angeles Times recently investigated what constitutes a travel-safe CBD oil. The conclusion is… there is no conclusion.

Epidiolex, a drug used to treat epilepsy in children, contains CBD. It’s the first CBD oil approved by the FDA, so the TSA changed its policies. Because that’s the only drug officially approved, the hard rule is: Don’t bring your recreational CDB in any form or substance on a plane.

But that doesn’t mean you’ll be caught packing it. The TSA doesn’t screen for marijuana or other illegal drugs, according to its website. If agents do find illegal substances, they’ll turn you over to law enforcement. But they’re not actively searching for them. Plus, if you go by the rule that all liquids must be under 3.4 ounces, your CBD product might be fine packed discreetly — next to your eye drops in a bathroom bag, for example.

Flying With Your Own Booze

We’ve already answered this one. Yes, you can bring certain types of booze on a plane. Anything you buy in the terminal past security can go on the plane. TSA largely treats alcohol like all other liquids, so most alcohols under 3.4 ounces (e.g., chasers) can go in your carry-on.

Larger liquor bottles must go in a checked bag. Here’s the catch: Checked liquor can’t exceed 70 percent ABV. As for drinking on the flight, that’s a no and can cost you up to $11,000 in fines. It’s up to you to decide how much you want to risk getting caught to avoid paying for United’s $8 mini bottle of Tito’s.

Flying With a Butt Plug

Yes, you can bring a butt plug on a plane. But can you wear one through TSA? Metal detectors won’t flag butt plugs made of rubber or silicone; however, a full-body scan might notice it. While it’s perfectly fine to wear a rubber one through TSA, it might look like you’re trying to smuggle something illegal — so you may be stopped and forced to explain.

The same logic goes for a carry-on. The shape of a butt plug could look like a bullet or a weapon, but that doesn’t mean you can’t bring it with you. If it vibrates, it might be scanned as a mysterious electronic and pulled out by security. Just be ready for the uncomfortable conversation with a TSA agent holding your pink toy while everyone behind you is livid that you’re holding the line up. Doesn’t that sound fun?

Flying With Poppers

And now for the grand hurrah. Can you bring poppers on a plane?

 

The answer — to my dismay — is no. Now before we start calling this rule homophobic, a TSA spokesperson tells me “flammable solvents” are a very real safety hazard.

“Flammable solvents aren’t allowed in either carry-on or checked bags. The airlines follow Federal Aviation Administration regulations on hazardous materials; however, some airline policies may be even more restrictive,” the rep tells MEL.

This hasn’t stopped people from successfully sneaking their 0.3-ounce Rush bottles through.

 

So if you want to join the mile-high club, you’ll probably be fine bringing your booze and your poppers through. But don’t be surprised if the TSA confiscates them.

Either way, just don’t spill.